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Graduate Teaching Assistant Resources

Feb 06, 2018 | by Estefany Palacio | Kennesaw State University

Graduate Teaching Assistant Resources

Article
A New Conceptual Model for Understanding International Student's College Needs
By: Eyad Alfattal
Abstract: This study concerns the theory and practice of international marketing in higher education with the purpose of exploring a conceptual model for understanding international students’ needs in the context of a four-year college in the United States. A transcendental phenomenological design was employed to investigate the essence of international students’ needs within their study experiences and explore a conceptual model that can explain these needs. Qualitative data were collected from 12 undergraduate and graduate international students through semi-structured interviews. Using thematic analysis, findings expand typical marketing mix frameworks and advance an eight-dimensional international student needs model: Program, Place, Price, Promotion, Process, People, Physical Facility, and Peace.
Source Location: Journal of International Students

Article
Critical Teacher Talk: Successful English for Academic Purposes Classroom Practices in a Global Campus
By: Namsook Kim
Abstract: Drawn on the sociocultural paradigm, I examined teacher-student communication with emphasis on teacher’s talk and its role on international students’ learning English as a Second Language in an English for Academic Purposes classroom in a global campus in the U.S. Developmental data analyses of class observations, teacher and student interviews, and documents led to finding multidimensional characteristics of Critical Teacher Talk (CTT). I also found evidence of the role of CTT on production-process- affective aspects of learning English as an International Language. The findings further shed insights on the need to train and practice Critical International Language Pedagogy with the triadic principles—transnational culture building, critical caring, and authentic learning—among international higher education educators and teacher educators.
Source Location: Journal of International Students

Article
Answering and Asking Questions
By: William E. Cashin
Abstract: This paper focuses on the answering and asking of questions in college-level courses and makes suggestions regarding questioning techniques for lecture classes and discussion groups. "Question" (Q) is defined as "any eliciting of an answer (response) regardless of grammatical form. "Answer" (A) is defined as "any response that fulfills the expectation of the question.""Reaction" (R) is defined as "any response that modifies (clarifies, expands) or rates (positively or negatively) a previous statement (question, answer, or another reaction)." It is pointed out that instructors experience difficulty in handling pauses and silence after posing a question, and it is recommended that instructors wait for a response. It is emphasized that it is desirable for an instructor to create a classroom atmosphere that welcomes questions from students. This atmosphere can be evoked by the teacher's asking for questions, listening to the students' questions adequately and answering the questions without belittling the students.
Source Location: IDEA Paper

Article
Assessing Graduate Teacher Training Programs: Can a Teaching Seminar Reduce Anxiety and Increase Confidence?
By: Julie A. Pelton
Abstract: Some effort to test the effectiveness of teacher assistant training programs is common, but these evaluations are typically limited to measures of student satisfaction. Two forms of assessment commonly used in elementary and secondary teacher training programs, measuring levels of teaching anxiety and teacher efficacy, may be of use for sociology programs interested in formally evaluating the effect of teaching seminars. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of a newly established teaching seminar using the Teaching Anxiety Scale and a Teaching Confidence Scale. Findings from pre- and posttest data show that the seminar lowered graduate students' feelings of anxiety about teaching for the first time and increased their levels of confidence regarding mastery of common pedagogical skills. Qualitative feedback from evaluations further illustrates the positive effects of the seminar on students' senses of themselves as teachers and their knowledge of effective teaching practices.
Source Location: Teaching Sociology

Article
Best Practice Strategies for Effective Use of Questions as a Teaching Tool
By: Toyin Tofade, Jamie Elsner, Stuart T. Haines
Abstract: Questions have long been used as a teaching tool by teachers and preceptors to assess students' knowledge, promote comprehension, and stimulate critical thinking. Well-crafted questions lead to new insights, generate discussion, and promote the comprehensive exploration of subject matter. Poorly constructed questions can stifle learning by creating confusion, intimidating students, and limiting creative thinking. Teachers most often ask lower-order, convergent questions that rely on students' factual recall of prior knowledge rather than asking higher-order, divergent questions that promote deep thinking, requiring students to analyze and evaluate concepts. This review summarizes the taxonomy of questions, provides strategies for formulating effective questions, and explores practical considerations to enhance student engagement and promote critical thinking. These concepts can be applied in the classroom and in experiential learning environments.
Source Location: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Article
Capturing the Experiences of International Teaching Assistants in the US American Classroom
By: Aparna Hebbani, Katherine Grace Hendrix
Abstract: This chapter presents findings from a qualitative study which investigated the perceptions of twenty-five ITAs toward US American undergraduates. The participant cohort comprised fourteen PhD and eleven master's students, of which, three were male and twenty-two were female ITAs teaching oral communication or a communication course requiring at least two graded assignments. The responses gathered via an online survey were content analyzed using Leximancer, a text analytic software program. We found that the master's students reflected more about issues pertaining to their own public speaking and confidence, while the PhD students were more concerned with the preparation and presentation of the course material. In addition to discussing these findings, one coauthor of this study adds her reflexive voice to the experience of being a nonnative English speaker teaching American students.
Source Location: New Directions for Teaching & Learning

Article
Developing Graduate Students' Self-Efficacy with Learner-Centered Lecturing
By: Meagan Troop, Lauren Wallar, Erin Aspenliender
Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a mixed-method case study conducted at the University of Guelph on the relationship between practice lecturing and graduate student self-efficacy. Building on the work of Boman (2013), and using surveys and individual interviews, we measured and characterized the perceived changes in graduate students' self-efficacy in learner-centred lecturing. Our research question was: In what ways, if any, does microteaching contribute to participants' perceived self- efficacy in learner-centred lecturing? Our results and discussion reveal that practice increases self-efficacy with respect to the design, facilitation, and assessment of learner-centred lectures, and is a vital component to graduate student teaching development programming.
Source Location: Canadian Journal of Higher Education

Article
Evaluating the Differential Impact of Teaching Assistant Training Programs on International Graduate Student Teaching
By: Ken N. Meadows, Karyn C. Olsen, Nanda Dimitrov, Debra L. Dawson
Abstract: In this study, we compared the effects of a traditional teaching assistant (TA) training program to those of a specialized program, with a substantial intercultural component, for international graduate students. We expected both programs to result in an increase in international graduate students' teaching self-efficacy, observed teaching effectiveness, and adoption of student-centred approaches to teaching, and we anticipated a greater degree of change for the participants in the specialized program. We found the expected increases for graduate students in both programs, with a larger increase in observed teaching effectiveness for students in the specialized program. We discuss the implications of tailoring TA training programs for international graduate students and of providing time and learning activities for the development of student-centred teaching and reflective practice.
Source Location: Canadian Journal of Higher Education

Article
Exploring teaching concerns and characteristics of graduate teaching assistants
By: YoonJung Cho, Myouongsook Kim, Marilla D. Svinicki, Mark Lowry Decker
Abstract: The purpose of the study was to explore a conceptual structure of graduate teaching assistant (GTA) teaching concerns. Results indicated that GTAs experience five distinct, inter-related types of concerns: class control, external evaluation, task, impact and role/time/communication. These 'teaching concerns' were further analysed by examining their relationship with the value placed on them by the GTAs and the confidence in dealing with the teaching-related issues of concern. The results revealed that GTAs tend to have concerns about self, task or role/time/communication- related issues when the nature of the concerned issues is perceived as being valuable but challenging. On the other hand, GTAs are more likely to have concerns with impact- related issues when the nature of the issues is perceived as both being valuable and manageable. Several GTA characteristics, such as teaching experience, teacher efficacy, participation in professional development and values on teaching practices, were examined as predictors of GTA teaching concerns.
Source Location: Teaching in Higher Education

Article
Graduate Student Teaching Development: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Training in Relation to Graduate Student Characteristics
By: Jennifer S. Boman
Abstract: In recent years, much attention has been given to the need for more empirical research to evaluate training programs that help prepare graduate students for their current and future teaching responsibilities. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a training workshop for graduate students who had varying levels of experience and diverse cultural backgrounds. Results indicated that over the course of training participants significantly increased their self-efficacy and effective teaching behaviours and decreased their public speaking apprehension. Although participants with varying levels of experience as well as participants with Canadian and international backgrounds benefited from the program, the results highlighted the need for additional teaching development opportunities for international graduate students.
Source Location: Canadian Journal of Higher Education

Article
International graduate students' difficulties: graduate classes as a community of practices
By: Hye Yeong Kim
Abstract: This study explores the factors that cause international graduate students to struggle and these students' ways of dealing with such problems in light of sociocultural theory, which views learning as a social and cultural act. The findings show that graduate classes function as communities of practices in which classmates and professors mutually engage with each other, share a repertoire and engage in joint enterprises. The practices were not always transparent to international students, which became a source of difficulty and often led them to feel excluded. Peripheral participation comprised a significant part of some students' learning process and identity formation, but it allowed them to participate in course-related activities as fully as they felt comfortable doing. This study suggests a need for more sensitive and dialogical efforts by educators in higher education to provide better learning environments for international learners.
Source Location: Teaching in Higher Education

Article
Living Life in Two Worlds: Acculturative Stress among Asian International Graduate Student Parents and Spouses
By: Judith A. Myers-Walls, Larissa V. Frias, Kyong-Ah Kwon, Mei-Ju Meryl Ko, ting Lu
Abstract: This qualitative study examined the experiences of Asian international graduate students and spouses with children at a university in the U. S. Participants (n= 31) from China, Korea, the Philippines, and Taiwan were interviewed regarding their Stressors. Some Stressors were identified in the answers of the group as a whole: (a) adjustment to a new culture; (b) feeling overwhelmed; (c) language difficulty; (d) feelings of isolation; (e) financial stress; and (f) marital stress. Stressors found only in the answers of the students were: (a) balancing multiple roles; (b) adjusting to the academic culture; (c) finding child care; and, among male students, d) worrying about the non-student spouse. Stressors unique to nonstudent spouses included: (a) loss of roles and status; (b) power imbalance in the couple relationships; and (c) feeling inadequate. Implications for research and practice with international graduate student parents/spouses are provided.
Source Location: Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Article
Mentoring Graduate Students in Teaching: The FCCIC Model
By: Jessie K. Finch, Celestino Fernandez
Abstract: Research has consistently shown the high value of mentorship for graduate students in various areas—program satisfaction, professional self-image, confidence, productivity, and so on. However, specific templates of how to best mentor graduate students, especially in the vital area of teaching, are lacking. This article outlines the mentoring model called “From Conception to Co-instructor to Completion” (FCCIC). This five-step method provides a plan of action for faculty and graduate students who wish to co-develop a course in such a way that graduate student mentees are exposed to the entire teaching process with the supervision and assistance of a faculty mentor. This relationship moves beyond the traditional “professor/teaching assistant” hierarchy (the TA model) to create equally operational co-instructors. In this note, the FCCIC method is summarized and then illustrated through the development of a sociology course on happiness as an exemplar of how to better mentor graduate students in teaching.
Source Location: Teaching Sociology

Article
Professional Development Through Community Partnership: How a Class Project Led to Graduate Student Teaching Practices
By: Heidi Laidemitt, Sarah Demola, Jaymee Martin, Caroline Kelley
Abstract: This article is written from the perspective of 4 current MA TESOL graduate students at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS). These students have written about their experiences by incorporating their theoretical and pedagogical English language-teaching knowledge into the growth and maintenance of a community-based ESL program at the Peace Resource Center in Seaside, California. The article highlights the continual development of their original peace and social justice-themed curriculum, which involves graduate students in Linguistics, Education, and non-TESOL courses at MIIS. The writers respectively reflect upon professional growth as a result of their commitment to the ESL program. In addition, their appendices and details of their work may serve as resources and tools for the TESOL community interested in curriculum development, needs assessment, community-based language instruction, language- program administration, ESL critical pedagogy, and content-based instruction.
Source Location: CATESOL Journal

Article
Reducing international graduate students’ language anxiety through oral pronunciation corrections
By: Eun Jeong Lee
Abstract: This mixed methods study examines the relationships between teachers' oral corrective feedback (CF) and changes in international graduate students' language anxiety levels. The participants were sixty advanced-level adult ESL students, all of whom were training to be teaching assistants (TAs) at a large Midwestern US university. The data were collected through classroom observations, survey questionnaires (pre- and post-surveys), and in-depth follow-up interviews with 40 of the 60 students. The study revealed that most of the teachers' oral CF had positive impacts on the students' affective variables, specifically lowering their anxiety about speaking English. However, certain clarification requests increased the students’ anxiety instead. These results highlight the potential affective risks of CF, and the study suggests how ESL instructors can use CF to encourage or even create positive emotional states in their ESL students.
Source Location: System

Article
Rethinking ESL Service Courses for International Graduate Students
By: Young-Kyung Min
Abstract: Drawing on data from a writing program in English as a second language (ESL) at a large university in the midwestern United States, this article addresses the significant gap in programmatic and pedagogical responses for graduate writing support by probing the notion of ESL service courses that approach graduate writing courses as being essentially the same as undergraduate writing courses. It looks into the teaching of writing and writing instructor training in TESOL by tracing the complex phenomenon by which first-year students in a master's in teaching English as a second language (MATESL) program-both native and nonnative speakers who do not have any experience of teaching let alone writing-become instructors of ESL graduate writing courses in which many doctoral students are enrolled. It raises questions about ESL practitioners' assumptions about the transfer of writing skills across disciplines and genres and examines the implications of English for academic purposes pedagogy for graduate students' writing practices. This article aims to prompt critical reflection on, and ultimately innovation in, writing programs designed for international graduate students while contributing to the development of a meta-disciplinary awareness of the study of ESL writing in TESOL.
Source Location: TESOL Journal

Article
Rites of Pedagogical Passage: How Graduate Student Instructors Negotiate the Challenges of First-time Teaching
By: Leandra M. Smollin, Arnold Arluke
Abstract: This study examines the dynamics of the first-time teaching experience of graduate instructors, drawing on interview and focus group data from 35 sociology students in a doctoral program at a large university in the United States. Results indicate the majority of graduate instructors felt a great deal of anxiety due to challenges they faced when teaching their own course for the first time: challenges such as feelings of unpreparedness, constant and unremitting time demands, problems with students, a lack of confidence, and insufficient support. Instructors employed a number of informal strategies in attempts to mediate the personal and professional impact of these challenges. Strategies included adjusting expectations, making sacrifices, becoming savvy, and creating informal peer networks that provided social support and increased access to resources. Findings indicate the need for institutional-level changes, including how graduate student teaching is viewed within the discipline and the ways graduate instructors are supported and prepared to teach. This article concludes with specific recommendations for graduate programs and sociology departments of sociology.
Source Location: Teaching Sociology

Article
Student to Scholar: Learning Experiences of International Students
By: Yolanda Michelle Palmer
Abstract: The author discusses the learning experiences and processes of selected international graduate students within a Canadian university as they progressed from student to scholar. Inspired by social learning theorists Lave and Wenger's (1991) notion of apprentice to masters in situated learning and communities of practice, the student to scholar framework sheds new light on the phenomenon of being an international graduate student. The arguments within the paper counter traditional views of learning as occurring solely through classroom engagements and offers that international graduate students learn and achieve "scholar" status through situated practice, professor mentoring and triple learning. Data were captured through observations and in-depth phenomenological and semi-structured interviews.
Source Location: Journal of International Students

Article
Surviving and Thriving: Recommendations for Graduate Student-teachers from Colleagues Further Along the Path
By: Carolyn Hoessler, Laura Kinderman, Alicia Hussain, Amelia Horsburgh
Abstract: Graduate students involved in teaching face multiple challenges, including providing frontline support for students, balancing relationships and time commitments, creating welcoming and effective classroom environments, engaging students, and creating or seeking supports as needed. They are supported by peers, who share insights and resources, and by faculty and staff, who provide teaching development opportunities. Going beyond informal conversations in teaching assistant offices, this article draws on the lived experience of interviewed graduate student-teachers, as well as faculty and staff who support them, to identify five key advice themes. Each theme was developed inductively from quotations, which have been interwoven with scholarship to provide advice that synthesizes the collective, scholarly, and personal insights of current and future graduate student-teachers, as well as the individuals and institutions seeking to support quality graduate student teaching.
Source Location: Transformative Dialogues: Teaching & Learning Journal

Article
Teacher Communication Concerns Revisited: Calling into Question the Gnawing Pull Towards Equilibrium
By: Deanna P. Dannels
Abstract: This study revisits the long-standing teacher communication concerns framework originating over three decades ago. Analysis of 10 years of contemporary GTA teacher communication concerns reveals a typology of 10 concerns, which taken together construct teaching as a process of negotiating relationships, managing identities, and focusing attention. Results add depth to the original teacher communication concerns framework, yet complicate the typological distinctions that often define that framework. Specifically, results suggest that teacher communication concerns are multidimensional, multimodal, dynamic, iterative, and equilibrium-driven. Based on the results, I suggest a new metaphorical framework for teacher-training scholarship and practice.
Source Location: Communication Education

Article
The graduate teaching assistant (GTA): lessons from North American experience 
By: Chris Park
Abstract: The employment of graduate students on a part-time basis to help with the teaching of undergraduates is growing in the UK and many higher education institutions are confronted with challenges about how best to do this. UK institutions have much to learn from North American experience of appointing graduate teaching assistants (GTAs), and this paper seeks to highlight key lessons by reviewing published literature on the use of GTAs in North America. After sketching out the emerging context in the UK, some important implications of North American experience in the selection and preparation, training, supervision and mentoring of GTAs are explored. The paper also identifies lessons relating to practical issues (including communication and managing conflict), personal issues (including reflective practices, and issues of identity and self-worth) and professional development issues (including GTAs as aspiring academics and the ambiguity of the GTA role).
Source Location: Teaching in Higher Education

Article
The Not-so-Easy Road of Overseas Study: Life Like an Outsider
By: Yolanda Palmer
Abstract: Contemplating my graduate student experience overseas, I constantly viewed myself as an isolate, one who did not belong in the new community of practice. I encountered numerous lingua-cultural, academic and social challenges which led to my lack of community and belonging. This paper is a reflection of my experiences as an international graduate student in a Canadian university. Through this reflection, I explore some of my most potent experiences and how these influenced me as I sojourned through the not-so-easy road of study overseas. This paper also describes the processes I used that enabled me to successfully maneuver and negotiate my journey on the not-so-easy-road of studying in a post-secondary institution overseas.
Source Location: Journal of International Students

Article
When inputs are outputs: The case of graduate student instructors
By: Eric P. Bettinger, Bridget Terry Long, Eric S. Taylor
Abstract: We examine graduate student teaching as an input to two production processes: the education of undergraduates and the development of graduate students themselves. Undergraduates are more likely to major in a subject if their first course in the subject was taught by a graduate student, a result opposite of estimates that ignore selection. Graduate students who teach more frequently graduate earlier and are more likely to subsequently be employed by a college or university.
Source Location: Economics of Education Review

Book
Teaching at University : A Guide for Postgraduates and Researchers
By: Kate Morss, Rowena Murray
Source Location: KSU Library Online Access

Book
Learner-centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice
By: Maryellen Weimer
Source Location: KSU Library Online Access

Book
Developing learner-centered teaching a practical guide for faculty
By: Phyllis Blumberg
Source Location: KSU Library Online Access

Book
Learner-centered teaching putting the research on learning into practice
By: Terry Doyle
Source Location: KSU Library Online Access

Book
Learner-centered instruction : building relationships for student success
By: Jeffrey H. Cornelius-White, Adam P. Harbaugh
Source Location: Johnson Library General Collection

Book
The Professional development of graduate teaching assistants
By: Michele Marincovich, Jack Prostko, Frederic Stout
Source Location: GIL Express 

Book
Planning a college course: a guidebook for the graduate teaching assistant
By: Michael P. Ryan, Gretchen G. Martens
Source Location: Sturgis Library General Collection

Book
Strategies for teaching first-year composition
By: Duane H. Roen
Source Location: Johnson Library General Collection 

Book
The graduate student as teacher
By: Vincent Nowlis, Kenneth E. Clark, Miriam Rock
Source Location: Johnson Library General Collection