Kennesaw State University

Marietta

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Help your students achieve deep learning through real-world experiential, creative, group oriented work. In this workshop we will uncover some of the theoretical principles behind why experiential learning can be so effective. Dr. David Veazie will present a case study of how he motivates his students to go above and beyond normal expectations for learning by incorporating open-ended, project-based experiential learning with his students, and we will explore together how we can utilize research in the learning sciences to design experiential, group-oriented learning that can unlock creative, deep learning experiences for your students. This event is coordinated so that immediately after the workshop you can enjoy the results of a fun and valuable experiential learning event by attending the KSU Annual First Year Students’ Pumpkin Launch Extravaganza.

Presented By

Thursday, October 5, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Linda Nilson describes a course grading system that is designed to maintain high academic standards, align final grades to student achievement of the course learning outcomes, increase student motivation to complete quality work, and reduce grading time for faculty. Could this system work for your courses? Join the discussion!

Presented By

Monday, August 28, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

One of the biggest challenges we face is how to turn the grading process for our students into a constructive learning experience. This workshop will focus on how to generate effective feedback that is frequent, timely, based on clear criteria, encouraging, and targeted. During the workshop, we will explore some of the research about what makes feedback effective. Also, Dr. Mir Atiqullah will share an effective methodology for how he helps his students take the next step from their current level to the next achievable level of performance. Participants will leave with a plan to enhance the feedback we provide to our students.

Presented By

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 2:00pm to 3:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Michael Reder (2006) states that assigning student writing is an “efficient way not only to engage students with the content of the material they are learning but also to foster the development of the thinking abilities we want in our students.” Participants in this workshop will discuss research-based strategies for designing, assigning, and responding to student writing in our various disciplines. We will examine ways to scaffold writing-to-learn activities with longer writing assignments. We will also practice teacher-friendly strategies for responding to student writing. As a high-impact practice, writing-intensive classrooms are particularly effective in engaging and retaining first-year students.

Presented By

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Feeling too busy to redesign that in-class activity or grade that recent quiz? "Welcome to a gold mine of insights into strategies for how to have more energy, be more relaxed, ...and get a lot more accomplished with much less effort." Join us to tap into a bit of this gold mine as we discuss Getting Things Done: the art of stress-free productivity by David Allen.

Presented By

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 1:00pm to 2:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Come experience what it might be like to work in a Team-Based Learning classroom. The experience will be based in part on actual coursework from the facilitator’s nuclear engineering courses which were redesigned to be modeled after the Team-Based Learning approach of Michaelsen and Knight. However, the workshop is designed to appeal to a broad audience. In Team-Based Learning, the use of activities drives much of the instruction through extensive use of cooperative teams to enhance learning. During the workshop, participants will experience a number of important elements in the Team-Based Learning approach. This includes the Readiness Assurance Process, completing team-activity worksheets, and peer review of team members. In addition, the facilitator will share anecdotal and other basic evidence of how the course setup positively impacts student performance.

Presented By

Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber argue in The Slow Professor (2016) that "In the corporate university, power is transferred from faculty to managers, economic justifications dominate, and the familiar 'bottom line' eclipses pedagogical and intellectual concerns. Slow Professors advocate deliberation over acceleration. We need time to think, and so do our students. Time for reflection and open-ended inquiry is not a luxury but is crucial to what we do." (p.x) They suggest that in taking the slow approach to teaching, we must shift our focus from impact to pleasure, because "it may be that pleasure -- experienced by the instructor and the students" is the most important predictor of 'learning outcomes.'" (p.36). In this book club we will consider Berg and Seeber's "pedagogy of pleasure, " what it means for ourselves and for our students, and how slowing down to reflect and deliberate can improve our effectiveness in the classroom and beyond.

Presented By

Tuesday, January 3, 2017 - 2:55pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber argue in The Slow Professor (2016) that "In the corporate university, power is transferred from faculty to managers, economic justifications dominate, and the familiar 'bottom line' eclipses pedagogical and intellectual concerns. Slow Professors advocate deliberation over acceleration. We need time to think, and so do our students. Time for reflection and open-ended inquiry is not a luxury but is crucial to what we do." (p.x) They suggest that in taking the slow approach to teaching, we must shift our focus from impact to pleasure, because "it may be that pleasure -- experienced by the instructor and the students" is the most important predictor of 'learning outcomes.'" (p.36). In this book club we will consider Berg and Seeber's "pedagogy of pleasure, " what it means for ourselves and for our students, and how slowing down to reflect and deliberate can improve our effectiveness in the classroom and beyond.

Presented By

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Join us as we unpack the meaning and purpose of the High-Impact Practice of community engagement. In this workshop, we will describe the spectrum of community engagement efforts students might undertake in your courses. We will also connect you with resources that will support you in your efforts to help students meaningfully engage with the community outside of the university. Finally, we will spend time creating an action plan for developing and implementing your own community engagement project.

Presented By

Thursday, December 8, 2016 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

This workshop will review key components of the application, Faculty Development & Awards Committee (FDAC) submission requirements, and effective strategies for construction applications.

Presented By

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