Kennesaw State University

Learning-Centered Teaching

Learning-Centered Teaching Events

There are currently no upcoming Learning-Centered Teachingevents. In the meantime take a look at some of the previous Learning-Centered Teaching events.

Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

In this workshop, author and fellow KSU faculty member Dr. Seneca Vaught will take us through the argument in his new book. We will consider the hidden costs of college and the shortcomings of considering education merely as a commodity, paying particular attention to groups of students who regularly shoulder more of that cost. We will broaden the definition of investment, moving from a guild mentality to considering long-term returns beyond financial earnings, so that we can have productive conversations with our students about the value of their education.

Presented By

Monday, November 5, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

If you find yourself wondering why your students' exam results are often worse than their homework and class activity results, this workshop is for you. We will discuss strategies and tools to incorporate the use of purposeful knowledge network development throughout our teaching in order to help students transfer what they learn from lecture and practice to other contexts, including in exams and later in life.

Presented By

Friday, October 19, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

This workshop will focus on Growth Mindset research from Carol Dweck. We will explore what it means for you to have a growth mindset and how you can encourage this mindset with your students.

Presented By

Monday, September 24, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

Alexander Astin contends that higher education is biased toward students who are perceived as smart. As a consequence, the curricular structure and individual courses are designed to reward students who are "smart" and penalize (if not pose insurmountable barriers to) students who are not. This book club will discuss how a bias toward "smartness" affects our own teaching and limits what our students can accomplish. We will also consider Astin's suggestions for what we can do to change our mindsets as instructors and improve the success of more, equally deserving, students. Sign up to receive a free book and a discussion fitting for the USG's "Momentum Year."

Presented By