Kennesaw State University

Assessment

Friday, April 1, 2011 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Lab

Assessment is the latest trend to sweep higher education. While its theoretical roots trace back to a desire to use assignments and exams to extend learning and improve teaching, the actual implementation of certain recommended practices in the classroom leaves many educators confused or frustrated, wondering if this isn't all a giant bean counting exercise in futility. In this session we will demystify assessment by comparing several theories of classroom assessment and introducing some tools and strategies with high impact-to-cost ratio. We well discuss how to tailor some of the ideas presented to different educational contexts and disciplines.

Presented By

Friday, January 27, 2012 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Conference Room

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATS) are strategies faculty can use during a class to determine whether and how well students are learning. Using CATS can help faculty and students identify and address areas of confusion so that students can perform more successfully on examinations and assignments. This session will introduce several CATS such as the Minute Paper, the Misconception/Preconception Check, the Background Knowledge Probe, and Teacher-Designed Feedback Forms.

Presented By

Tuesday, February 2, 2010 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Conference Room

A general audience presentation of long-running efforts to assess teacher competence and performance, with reasonable doubts that assessments will be valid. Pros and cons of student assessment of instruction. Critical incidents. Assessing portfolio assessment. Protecting the institution and protecting the instructor. A small amount of humor. A large amount of concern. Audience commentary.

Presented By

Monday, February 1, 2010 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
College of the Arts

Assessments are communications and they are literature. And of course assessments can be of high and low quality. This is a presentation and discussion session with faculty members examining the role of assessment in arts programs in higher education. Roles and expectations of assessment, accreditation, and program evaluation will be considered. Some stories. Also talk about institutional assessment. Bright and shiny are not always good.

Presented By

Friday, November 20, 2009 - 10:00am to 11:30am
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Lab

While the AAUP addresses general ethical responsibilities in its 1987 Statement on Professional Ethics and 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, as faculty we face many dilemmas that represent ethical conflicts that are not necessarily explicitly addressed in the AAUP statements. As with any potential ethical dilemma, clear cut answers are not always evident. Using a case study approach, this series of workshops will explore the types of ethical dilemmas faced by faculty and discuss issues and solutions.

Workshop C focuses on issues related to grading and student performances evaluation such as the establishment and enforcement of grading policies, fairness in assigning grades, and performance feedback to students.

Presented By

Friday, October 23, 2009 - 10:00am to Monday, November 23, 2009 - 11:30am
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
Burruss Bldg 109

While the AAUP addresses general ethical responsibilities in its 1987 Statement on Professional Ethics and 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, as faculty we face many dilemmas that represent ethical conflicts that are not necessarily explicitly addressed in the AAUP statements. As with any potential ethical dilemma, clear cut answers are not always evident. Using a case study approach, this series of workshops will explore the types of ethical dilemmas faced by faculty and discuss issues and solutions.

Workshop B focuses on issues related to course content and its presentation such as the effect of an instructors' personal behavior in the classroom, the selection and presentation of course material, the appropriateness of selected in-class learning activities as it relates to protection of student dignity and privacy, pedagogical soundness, and addressing controversial topics.

Presented By

Friday, November 16, 2007 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Location: 
CETL House #54: Conference Room

We've learned about Learner-Centered Teaching, and maybe we've even tried it a bit. But how do we assess what we've done? How do we justify to our students and our colleagues (and our supervisors) that this is worth doing, even if it's a bit painful at first?

Presented By

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