Kennesaw State University

Book Chat

Monday, October 21, 2019 - 3:30pm to 4:45pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Engaging students through active learning has been shown to improve learning outcomes across many contexts. Perhaps the largest set of active learning approaches uses collaborative learning techniques. Collaborative Learning Techniques is a handbook grounded in the scholarship of teaching and learning that introduces teachers to 30 different collaborative learning techniques. Each technique includes organized information on what to do, how to do it, and why it is important to student learning. Underpinning all of these techniques, the authors also offer practical advice on how to form groups, assign roles, facilitative team success, and grade student participation.

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Friday, April 19, 2019 - 8:30am to 9:45am
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Using small group collaborative learning can be a transformative experience for our students, but how do we ensure it is transformative in a good way? In the seminal text "Team-Based Learning: a Transformative Use of Small Groups in College Teaching", Michaelsen, Knight, and Fink provide a comprehensive set of guidelines for incorporating formal teamwork into college courses. Topics addressed include specific procedures to help form groups and turn them into high-performing teams, to the "4S" rules for designing effective in-class activities, to discipline-specific recommendations and lessons learned, and more. Come and share your thoughts about how techniques from this book can help crank up learning in your course.

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Monday, March 18, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #54: Book Club Room

Even though the book is five years old, Selingo’s analysis is still relevant. From his experience as an editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education, he traces problematic administrative practices that took hold in the first decade of the millennium (building debt and promoting a customer mentality with regards to students). Together with unforeseen societal changes, such as economic crises and disruptive technologies, these practices have exacerbated the college dropout problem and made students question the value of a college degree. Join us for this chat to discuss what of his analysis resonates with your experience, the likelihood of the future he predicts, and the applicability of the strategies he suggests.

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Monday, February 11, 2019 - 11:15am to 12:05pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Join us for a book chat about Teaching University Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Guide to Developing Academic Capacity and Proficiency by Kim Draisma and Kimberley McMahon-Coleman (2016). We will discuss how autism presents itself in our classes and strategies for teaching students who fall within the autism spectrum.

Presented By

Thursday, January 24, 2019 - 11:00am to 12:30pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #54: Book Club Room

Many of us educators feel like they are walking on eggshells when they express their thoughts in the classroom and when they are faced with unsophisticated student comments. The discourse is rife with loaded terms such as “coddling," “trigger warnings,” “political correctness,” “safe spaces.” How do we balance the principles of academic freedom, freedom of speech and expression, and inclusive learning environments? How can we protect ourselves and our students? The authors (one the dean of the Law School at University of California Berkeley and the other the chancellor of University of California Irvine) provide a review of what schools can and cannot do, but, more importantly, discuss what’s at stake when we talk about censorship and hate speech. Come add your perspective to the discussion!

Presented By

Tag: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 2:00pm to 3:15pm
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

Making small changes to our teaching can make a big impact on student learning and no one knows that better than James Lang. In his book, Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons From the Science of Learning, Lang outlines learning theories and principles, describes multiple models, and offers practical advice and strategies for transforming teaching and learning. Book club participants receive a free copy of the book, so sign up and join us to discuss how we might apply Lang's ideas in our own classrooms.

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Monday, September 24, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

Alexander Astin contends that higher education is biased toward students who are perceived as smart. As a consequence, the curricular structure and individual courses are designed to reward students who are "smart" and penalize (if not pose insurmountable barriers to) students who are not. This book club will discuss how a bias toward "smartness" affects our own teaching and limits what our students can accomplish. We will also consider Astin's suggestions for what we can do to change our mindsets as instructors and improve the success of more, equally deserving, students. Sign up to receive a free book and a discussion fitting for the USG's "Momentum Year."

Presented By

Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #54: Book Chat room

Why do you do what you do? Simon Sinek's book Start With Why explains the need to establish your why in your work. He frames this discussion in the model of The Golden Circle. The Book Chat discussion with explore the what, how, and why in our work, and how we direclty and indirectly share our why with others.

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Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 9:00am to 10:00am
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Introverts are some of the most creative and productive people, but are often stereotyped as shy and forced to navigate work and class environments designed for extroverts. With the rise of group work in classes, emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration, and open discussions of often contentious issues in faculty meetings, introverts can feel marginalized. Yet, this need not be the case. In this book Susan Cain examines the power of introverts and how they can leverage their strengths to thrive in these contexts. She also provides valuable incites for extrovert faculty who work with and teach introverts.

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Monday, February 19, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #54: Book Chat room

Students are coming out as trans* in college at much higher rates than in the past, and many eductors feel unprepared to reach them. This book is a great resource in that direction. Rather than looking at trans* students from a deficit perspective, as problems needing to be accommodated, Z Nicolazzo uses a framework of resilience and agency to shape hir empirical study. The book also provides a glossary and answers to commonly asked questions about gender beyond the binary.

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