Kennesaw State University

Diversity

Friday, October 30, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:30pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Building Q Room 316

How do you create and sustain a welcoming classroom environment for students of diverse backgrounds and experiences? Have you encountered resistance from some students? In this interactive session we will explore factors that affect classroom climate such as content, tone, stereotypes, and faculty-student interactions. Participants will generate ideas and apply alternative strategies to readily employ in their classroom materials and activities.

Presented By

Tag: 
Wednesday, August 19, 2015 - 9:30am to 11:00am
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House 3211

Research clearly shows that the course climate affects student learning, critical thinking, and career preparation. In this interactive session, participants will explore ways to create an "explicitly centralizing" classroom climate, one in which marginalized and multiple perspectives are intentionally integrated into course content and activities. Participants will discuss factors affecting classroom climate such as course content, tone, stereotype threat, and faculty-student interactions, and they will generate alternative strategies to readily employ in their classes.

Presented By

Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab


This classic book was suggested by participants at the book club on “Whistling Vivaldi” as an ideal follow up. Now the president of Spelman College, Dr. Tatum was trained as a developmental psychologist, specializing in racial identity development. Her insights about how to think about racism and coping strategies for minority students are as relevant as ever. She is also interested in why talking about racism is challenging for all people, and provides strategies for how to engage in those conversations productively. While the two books support each other, Whistling Vivaldi is not a pre-requisite for participation in this book club.

Limited to 15 participants. Each will receive a copy of the book.

Presented By

Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Lab

Because of their status as an invisible minority, queer students often find it difficult to have their voices heard in the classroom. Drawing on the 7 principles of learning and on social identity theory, we will discuss the impact of the course climate on LGBTQ students and discuss pedagogical strategies that instructors can use to create a safe and respectful learning environment for all students.

Presented By

Tag: 
Friday, February 17, 2012 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Location: 
CETL House #54: Lab

The details of the life of Malcolm X have long since calcified into a familiar narrative. However the late scholar Manning Marable’s new biography is the result of two decades of research and forces us to rethink what we know. The book is described as “a stunning achievement, filled with new information and shocking revelations that will re-frame the way we understand his (Malcolm’s) life and work.” Malcolm X: A life of Reinvention will stand as the definitive and controversial work on one of the most iconic figures of the twentieth century. Join us as we examine this colossal contribution of scholarship on one of the most iconic figures of the twentieth century.

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Thursday, March 3, 2011 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Location: 
CETL House #54: Conference Room

How race is lived in “real” life is how race is lived in cyberspace is a commonly held hypothesis. Join us as we examine this supposition via an examination of the book text titled Race in Cyberspace, Kolka, B, Nakamura, L, & Rodman, G. (Ed.). Topics to be examined will include the role language plays in the construction of racialized online identities; offline representations of cyberspace as a racially coded environment; and the impact technology and education has on race equity. Register now to ensure your participation in what will be a dynamic book club event. A copy of this compelling book will be forwarded to you once registration is completed. Quantities are limited to the first 14 registered. Each person shall receive a copy of each publication through campus mail. In the event that registered participants are not able to attend, we ask you return your book to CETL MB# 5400

Presented By

Friday, March 18, 2011 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Lab

This roundtable will examine how to best secure an effective classroom environment and enhance university curricula values by exploring some diversity myths. Several faculty and staff with expertise in various areas of diversity pedagogy will present the myths connected to their areas of concern and expertise. More importantly, the panelists will present measures/solutions to best address these myths within and outside the classroom.

Presented By

Thursday, November 10, 2011 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Lab

Thirty years ago Pink Floyd’s Another Brick in the Wall exclaimed “we don’t need no education,” Hip Hop’s prevailing attitudes about higher education echoes a similar sentiment. Considering more than 85% of millennial students self-identify as active participants in hip hop culture, examining the convergence and divergence between hip hop culture and higher education may be a pivotal in understanding the millennial generation. Join the “serious fun” as we examine hip hop historiography, anti-intellectualism, and higher education.

Presented By

Tag: 
Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 11:00am to 12:30pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Location: 
CETL House #54: Conference Room

Engaging teaching cannot adequately be achieved without diversity as a core value. Yet, the tendency is to continue to make assumption about methodology, theory, and practiced in the classroom to meet diversity goals. The research on diversity clearly validates the ideal that learning and teaching diversity in the classroom enhances social development, increases student knowledge of others, prepare students to engage in a global society, and promotes creativity and self-awareness, among other things. Thus this workshop will address: * seminal theories and scholarship connected to teaching diverse populations
* the do's and don'ts of classroom management
* cross-cultural communication and the classroom, and
* best practices (what works and why)
Please join us to hear and share the best approaches to achieve Goal 6 of KSU's Strategic Plan.

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