Kennesaw State University

Teaching Effectiveness

Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Campus: 
Location: 
Virtual

This webinar will provide strategies for teaching large classes with a learning-centered approach. Large classes present challenges for instructors and learners alike, and many instructors struggle with how to scale up the active learning pedagogy that is effective in their smaller classes. Participants will consider the literature on effective teaching practices for large classes and identify solutions to the challenges discussed. The facilitators will present examples from the literature, as well as lessons learned from their own teaching and from working with other faculty who have faced similar challenges and worked to overcome them.

Presented By

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Event Type: 
Virtual
Campus: 
Location: 
Virtual

This introductory webinar is designed for faculty who are considering or currently mentoring and advising graduate students. Drawing from evidence-based research, this interactive webinar explores general guidelines for how to productively mentor graduate students. Participants will establish effective strategies for initial meetings, explore mentor’s responsibilities, and identify effective practices to support graduate students.

Presented By

Monday, September 11, 2017 - 2:00pm to 3:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

Are you looking for ideas on how to improve assignments to give students useful feedback while reducing the time and effort of grading? We will discuss how to design rubrics and checklists to grade student work and will provide numerous examples that you can readily adapt to your own courses.

Presented By

Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

Learn how to create collaborative assignments that cross curricular boundaries, enabling your students to see how their courses are linked to one another and to the real world. Participants will use the Washington Center’s Integrative Assignment protocol to create an integrative assignment that can be used in a learning community, team teaching experience, or standalone course.

Presented By

Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 11:00am to 12:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Conference Room

This workshop will provide strategies for teaching large classes with a learning-centered approach. Large classes present challenges for instructors and learners alike, and many instructors struggle with how to scale up the active learning pedagogy that is effective in their smaller classes. Participants will discuss their own challenges in this regard, consider the literature on effective teaching practices for large classes, and work together to identify solutions to the challenges discussed. The facilitators will inform the discussion with examples from the literature, as well as lessons learned from their own teaching and from working with other faculty who have faced similar challenges and worked to overcome them.

Presented By

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 2:00pm to 3:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Michael Reder (2006) states that assigning student writing is an “efficient way not only to engage students with the content of the material they are learning but also to foster the development of the thinking abilities we want in our students.” Participants in this workshop will discuss research-based strategies for designing, assigning, and responding to student writing in our various disciplines. We will examine ways to scaffold writing-to-learn activities with longer writing assignments. We will also practice teacher-friendly strategies for responding to student writing. As a high-impact practice, writing-intensive classrooms are particularly effective in engaging and retaining first-year students.

Presented By

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Virtual
Campus: 
Location: 
Virtual

College teachers are well aware that students learn best when they are not fearful or anxious. We also know students lives may be affected by poverty, addiction, interpersonal violence, divorce, or the death of a family member or friend. Drawing upon developmental theories and recent studies about grit (Stoltz 2014) and perseverance through stressful times (Brown 2015), this webinar offers tools for teachers to discuss grades, classroom performance, or learning strategies for students in crisis.

Presented By

Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Conference Room

In an increasingly noisy world, “There are many reasons why bringing silence into university classrooms might be a smart move,” according to Helen Lees (2013). Research on silence as a pedagogical approach ranges from intentionally inserting pauses into the curriculum to developing more sustained approaches to silent observations or reflection. Participants will talk about how we might purposefully integrate silence to not only enhance student learning but also to challenge our assumptions about the quiet students in our classrooms. We will also ask how power dynamics are related to silence. Participants will generate strategies for integrating silence into their unique classroom environments.

Presented By

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 1:00pm to 2:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Come experience what it might be like to work in a Team-Based Learning classroom. The experience will be based in part on actual coursework from the facilitator’s nuclear engineering courses which were redesigned to be modeled after the Team-Based Learning approach of Michaelsen and Knight. However, the workshop is designed to appeal to a broad audience. In Team-Based Learning, the use of activities drives much of the instruction through extensive use of cooperative teams to enhance learning. During the workshop, participants will experience a number of important elements in the Team-Based Learning approach. This includes the Readiness Assurance Process, completing team-activity worksheets, and peer review of team members. In addition, the facilitator will share anecdotal and other basic evidence of how the course setup positively impacts student performance.

Presented By

Tuesday, January 3, 2017 - 2:55pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber argue in The Slow Professor (2016) that "In the corporate university, power is transferred from faculty to managers, economic justifications dominate, and the familiar 'bottom line' eclipses pedagogical and intellectual concerns. Slow Professors advocate deliberation over acceleration. We need time to think, and so do our students. Time for reflection and open-ended inquiry is not a luxury but is crucial to what we do." (p.x) They suggest that in taking the slow approach to teaching, we must shift our focus from impact to pleasure, because "it may be that pleasure -- experienced by the instructor and the students" is the most important predictor of 'learning outcomes.'" (p.36). In this book club we will consider Berg and Seeber's "pedagogy of pleasure, " what it means for ourselves and for our students, and how slowing down to reflect and deliberate can improve our effectiveness in the classroom and beyond.

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