Kennesaw State University

Teaching Effectiveness

Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Event Type: 
Book Club
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

Angela Duckworth has spent many years studying what predicts high levels of success. She has found that those among us who reach the highest levels of achievement demonstrate over time a combination of interest, practice, purpose and hope - or what she terms "grit." Gritty people focus on one thing and continue in the face of adversity. They may get disappointed, but do not remain so for long. They continue to practice despite setbacks because they are not only interested but also find meaning in what they do. Join us for a discussion of how we can apply her findings to the context of academia and how we as faculty, and our students, can increase our grit to achieve our immediate goals and greater purpose.

Presented By

Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

*Session Registration Closed.

CETL is currently conducting an IRB approved study on learning-focused courses. This workshop will introduce the participants to current research about creating a learning-centered syllabus, as well at the opportunity to actively make changes and improvements to their syllabus. By attending, participants will give their consent to become part of the research study. This study is supported by the rubric and research of: Palmer, M. S., Bach, D. J., & Streifer, A. C. (2014). Measuring the promise: A learning_focused syllabus rubric. To improve the academy: A journal of educational development, 33 (1), 14-36.

Presented By

Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

*Session Registration is closed.

CETL is currently conducting an IRB approved study on learning-focused courses. This workshop will introduce the participants to current research about creating a learning-centered syllabus, as well at the opportunity to actively make changes and improvements to their syllabus. By attending, participants will give their consent to become part of the research study. This study is supported by the rubric and research of: Palmer, M. S., Bach, D. J., & Streifer, A. C. (2014). Measuring the promise: A learning_focused syllabus rubric. To improve the academy: A journal of educational development, 33 (1), 14-36.

Presented By

Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Event Type: 
Virtual
Campus: 
Location: 
Virtual

What's the trouble with grades? Walvoord and Anderson (2010) state, when we talk about grades, educators have student learning most in mind. However, our students may have different perspectives about grades. Participants in this webinar will discuss grading processes and products that spur communication with students. We will identify research-based tools and strategies to motivate and engage students in grading practices to improve teaching and learning in our classrooms.

Part Time Faculty Note: This workshop is uncompensated. Part-time faculty who participate will not be compensated but should still enter participation hours in the time management system.

Presented By

Monday, October 24, 2016 - 3:30pm to 4:45pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Lab

What's the trouble with grades? Walvoord and Anderson (2010) state, when we talk about grades, educators have student learning most in mind. However, our students may have different perspectives about grades. Participants in this webinar will discuss grading processes and products that spur communication with students. We will identify research-based tools and strategies to motivate and engage students in grading practices to improve teaching and learning in our classrooms.

Part Time Faculty Note: This workshop is uncompensated. Part-time faculty who participate will not be compensated but should still enter participation hours in the time management system.

Presented By

Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 2:00pm to 3:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House #3211: Conference Room

College teachers are well aware that students learn best when they are not fearful or anxious. We also know students lives may be affected by poverty, addiction, interpersonal violence, divorce, or the death of a family member or friend. Drawing upon developmental theories and recent studies about grit (Stoltz 2014) and perseverance through stressful times (Brown 2015), this workshop offers tools for teachers to discuss grades, classroom performance, or learning strategies for students in crisis.

Presented By

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
Academic Building (H) - Room 202

Presented By

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 3:45pm to 4:45pm
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House 3211

In a time when college students are refusing to read award-winning books because they will be offended, it's time to talk about trigger warnings. Our discussion focuses on two recent articles on the topic: 'The Trigger Warning Myth' and the Atlantic's 'The Coddling of the American Mind,' to interrogate or resolve the questions of when, how, or if educators should be providing trigger warnings.

Presented By

Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:15pm
Event Type: 
Workshop
Campus: 
Location: 
CETL House 3211

Participants will learn strategies for collecting evidence of their teaching effectiveness such as classroom assessment techniques, peer review of course materials, and documenting changes in student behaviors and performance in the classroom. We will also examine recent alternatives to exploring teaching effectiveness, such as the Teaching Practices Inventory (Wieman & Gilbert, 2014) and the Teaching Balanced Score Card (Hughes & Pate, 2013).

Presented By

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Virtual
Campus: 
Location: 
Virtual

The facilitation of discussion is a teaching technique that many of us use in our classes. Yet, so often we don't draw out the level of engagement we would like to see from our students, either in terms of quality of distribution or participation throughout the class. This short webinar will highlight simple yet effective discussion facilitation practices from the literature and the facilitators' teaching experiences. By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify practical steps they can take to get more students to participate regularly with high quality contributions, both in face-to-face and online classes.

Presented By

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